By Eloise Evans on 18/07/2016

If you are looking into making your garden a bit more interesting and nicer to look at or you need a cure from a waterlogged garden in the rainy season, then a pond is what is right for you! A pond is always a lovely feature to add that also gives a good home to nature and is a great way to aid garden drainage if placed in the correct spot in the garden.

However, a pond is a delicate balance that needs time when putting together. You can’t simply dig a hole in the back garden, put the garden hose in and turn on the tap. Ponds will need to be set up in a certain way, and there are two different methods depending on whether you are building a pond for aesthetics or for helping with garden drainage.

 

Building a Pond for Landscaping:

The initial thing you need to do is pick an area of your garden that you want to place your pond. Decide how big you want your pond to be and clear any turf from the area (but don’t get rid of it, we can use it a bit later on). Use some string or sand to mark out your pond. TOP TIP: make sure this is larger than you want the actual pond to be, as the hole will always look bigger than the final pond. Dig it out (the soil should be kept to one side, as this again can be used later).

Line the hole with something so that the plastic liner won’t puncture – this can be sand, a smooth layer of newspapers or an old carpet. You can buy pond lining from most DIY stores, and when you’re estimating the size, the best thing to do is follow this calculation: Liner length = the longest length of the pond x the depth twice plus a bit extra to be sure, and the same for the width. So: L = L x (Dx2). W = W x (Dx2). For example: A pond is 3 metres (L) x 2 metres (W) x 1 metre (D): 3 x (1x2) = 6, 2 x (1x2) = 4. Then just add a little extra to that for precautions. This may sound a bit complicated, so you can also pick an easier option and search pond liner calculator on the internet, there are plenty of them!

Once you’ve done the complicated maths part (or easy internet search), you’ll need to cut it to the correct size (remember to be generous with this, as once it is cut, it can’t be stuck back together if it is too small!) Lay the now correctly sized liner inside the pond hole without stretching it too much. Make sure the liner is large enough to overlap the edges of the pond and is temporarily weighed down. Then add some more sand and soil mix over the liner so that it is protected from sunlight.

After the pond is completely ready, you can now start filling it with water. The best way to do this is by being pre-emptive and setting out water butts prior to setting of the pond so that you can use rain water to fill the pond, or creating the pond and letting it naturally fill with rain water. This shouldn’t be too difficult if you live in Britain, especially in summer as that seems to be when it rains most! 

Once it is filled, you can then remove the temporary weights and cover up the edges with the turf from earlier (we told you we’d use it later) so that it looks nicer and is protected from sunlight.

The soil from earlier (no, we didn’t forget this either) is a fantastic way to create a raised bed, or if you want to create a wildlife haven, it can be used to create homes for amphibians, reptiles and solitary bees. They can use this as a nesting, basking or hibernating area and will really appreciate it!

To then add plants to your pond, check out our post on how the create a water garden to add the correct aquatic plants to your pond to establish the perfect balance to attract insects and frogs and help other plants to grow.

Happy gardening!

 

Building a Pond for Drainage

If you are having trouble with a waterlogged garden and are needing to add something to help with drainage, then the best spot for your pond is the lowest point in your garden. You also need to mark out the drainage channels in your garden so that the water has an easy channel to flow through when it is raining. You can do this by marking out the areas of flowing water with pegs when it is raining heavily. Do this three or four times to make sure the drainage channels are correct. Once you have marked the drainage channels, dig these out making sure they are one foot deep and wide – don’t worry, once the pond is ready, we will make these a bit prettier!

Decide how big you want your pond to be and clear any turf from the area (but don’t get rid of it, we can use it a bit later on). Use some string or sand to mark out your pond. TOP TIP: make sure this is larger than you want the actual pond to be, as the hole will always look bigger than the final pond. Dig it out (the soil should be kept to one side, as this again can be used later).

After the pond is completely ready, you can now start filling it with water. The best way to do this is by being pre-emptive and setting out water butts prior to setting of the pond so that you can use rain water to fill the pond, or creating the pond and letting it naturally fill with rain water. This shouldn’t be too difficult if you live in Britain, especially in summer as that seems to be when it rains most! 

You will be wanting to make those drainage channels look a bit prettier, so you can now go ahead and fill these in with gravel or rocks to stop the soil collapsing in and giving excess water a way to flow easily to the pond. A word of warning when building a pond for drainage however is that if you get extremely heavy rain, it may still flood, but it will definitely aid the drainage issue.

The soil from earlier (no, we didn’t forget this either) is a fantastic way to create a raised bed, or if you want to create a wildlife haven, it can be used to create homes for amphibians, reptiles and solitary bees. They can use this as a nesting, basking or hibernating area and will really appreciate it!

To then add plants to your pond, check out our post on how the create a water garden to add the correct aquatic plants to your pond to establish the perfect balance to attract insects and frogs and help other plants to grow.

If you build a pond and are still having trouble with your gardens drainage, why not give Drain Doctor a call? We are the experts in all things drainage!

Happy gardening!

 

Post Source: RSBP / SFGate
Photo Source: Freepik